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Military to Share Records Related to Hearing Loss Allegedly Caused by 3M Earplugs

The Department of Defense and other governmental entities will produce information relating to the hearing loss records of its employees for use in the 3M Combat Arms earplug litigation. Disclosure of such records and other information critical to the plaintiffs’ claims are governed by the Privacy Act, which allows government agencies to release records under Court Order. 

Between 2002 and 2015, 3M was under contract with the U.S. government to provide its Dual-Ended Combat Arms Earplugs to protect service members from hearing loss associated with military training and operations. Plaintiffs in the 3M earplug lawsuit allege that the earplug loosened in the ear canal, rendering the product ineffective and potentially leading to permanent hearing damage, such as hearing loss or tinnitus (ringing in the ear).

To date, close to 1,000 U.S. veterans have filed lawsuits alleging that 3M knew about a design defect in the product, but failed to correct it. Moreover, 3M continued to sell the product to the U.S. military by the thousands.

If you or a loved one used 3M Combat Arms earplugs during your service in the U.S. military and suffer from hearing loss or tinnitus, please contact us by submitting the form or by calling us at (888) 984-7988 for a confidential evaluation of your potential claim.

 

NFL & NCAA Medics Work Together to Improve Football Safety

In June 2019, physicians and trainers from the NFL and NCAA spent two days in Indianapolis sharing data about the prevention and treatment of football-related injuries. Representatives from NFL Player Health & Safety, the NCAA Sport Science Institute, ACC, Big 12, Big Ten, Pac-12 and SEC attended.

According to findings discussed at the presentation, players are beginning to ask more questions about equipment, such as helmets, which help to prevent concussions. Severe concussions may result in loss of consciousness or amnesia, and can lead to long-term effects such as trouble concentrating, fatigue, delayed reaction speeds, and sensitivity to light and noise. Appropriately, topics at the session addressed concussion prevention and treatment, and equipment innovation. 

The NFL has made an estimated 50 rule changes to improve player safety in the past decade. College, high school and youth-league football leagues have not moved with the same sense of urgency as the NFL in changing player safety rules.

Jeff Miller, the NFL’s executive vice president for health and safety initiatives, hopes to improve collaboration with the NCAA in order to expand initiatives from 1,800 NFL players to a much larger number of NCAA players. “That’s going to allow [us] to reach conclusions a lot quicker and with more power because we’ll have more athletes,” he said.

If you played football at an NCAA member school and have been treated for a concussion-related injury during your time as a player, you may be entitled to compensation for your injuries. Please call us at 844-351-2394 if you believe you may have a potential NCAA football concussion injury claim.

Study: College Football Players Returning to Play After Concussion Risk Injury

A new study screening 89 National College Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I football players suggests that players who have previously sustained a concussion and returned to play are at high risk of re-injury because of decreased cognitive function. “While neurocognitive function, coordination and balance usually improve in seven to 10 days, subtle perceptual and motor control deficits can last far longer,” said Dr. Shellie Acocello, ATC, senior author of the study and assistant professor for the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga.

 Cognitive and motor skills help players to think about how to properly navigate the field and dodge opponents. However, concussions can affect players even after they believe they have recovered from the concussion. Long-term effects may include trouble concentrating, fatigue, delayed reaction speeds, and sensitivity to light and noise, which can affect a player’s performance on the field. Symptoms of a mild concussion include dizziness, tinnitus, and imbalance, which players can feel throughout the entire season. Severe concussions may result in loss of consciousness or amnesia. 

If you played football at an NCAA member school and have been treated for a concussion-related injury during your time as a player, you may be entitled to compensation for your injuries. Please call us at 844-351-2394 if you believe you may have a potential NCAA football concussion injury claim.

PG&E Debtors Will Not Contest Wildfire Causation 

Six months after filing for bankruptcy in January 2019, Pacific Gas & Electric—the utility company deemed responsible by investigators for certain tragic wildfires that raged through Northern California—filed a motion indicating it will not contest causation with respect to the 2018 Camp Fire or the twenty-two North Bay Fires that occurred in 2017. The motion will allow proceedings to continue to estimation hearings.

“Tens of thousands of California residents whose lives have been affected by the Wildfires need to know whether, and how much, they will recover from PG&E so they can continue the hard but necessary work of rebuilding lives that have been devastated by the Wildfires,” the court motion stated.

In May 2019, the California government concluded that PG&E is responsible for several deadly fires in California, including the 2018 Camp Fire. 

If you and your family suffered damages during the Camp Fire, please contact one of our attorneys today at (866) 265-0874 for a confidential evaluation of your potential claim. We offer free consultations.

 

Veteran Files New Lawsuit Against 3M Over Defective Earplugs

In one of the latest complaints filed against 3M over its reversible Combat Arms earplugs, a U.S. Army veteran indicates that he sustained hearing damage alleged to be caused by the company’s defective earplugs that did not properly fit into the ear canal. From 2007 through 2015, when the veteran was discharged, he used the 3M earplugs during training and two deployments. The veteran claims that he, along with millions of other service members, were issued the dual-ended earplugs that 3M continued to sell to the U.S. military for years, even though the company knew the earplugs were defective.

If you or a loved one used 3M Combat Arms earplugs during your service in the U.S. military and suffer from hearing loss or tinnitus, please contact us by submitting the form or by calling us at <a href="tel:8889847988">(888) 984-7988</a> for a confidential evaluation of your potential claim.

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